Being Open to Learning is Harder Than It Appears

There is a volume of information about carrying on meaningful conversations, especially about change. In the last posting I mentioned Grice’s Maxims which specify 4 qualities of conversation (from:

https://www.sas.upenn.edu/~haroldfs/dravling/grice.html )

  1. The maxim of quantity, where one tries to be as informative as one possibly can, and gives as much information as is needed, and no more.
  2. The maxim of quality, where one tries to be truthful, and does not give information that is false or that is not supported by evidence.
  3. The maxim of relation, where one tries to be relevant, and says things that are pertinent to the discussion.
  4. The maxim of manner, when one tries to be as clear, as brief, and as orderly as one can in what one says, and where one avoids obscurity and ambiguity

This appears to be fairly straightforward but, in my experience, not a simple task.

Looking at the work of Robinson, I think we get a more realistic orientation to the challenges of conversations that are open to learning, conversations in making changes.

Here is a quote from the author (Viviane M. J. Robinson) University of Auckland cautioning us that “Open to learning” conversations are not easy, even when an administrator is talking with a teacher:

The Key Components of an Open-to-learning Conversation. There are no rules or step-by-step guides to open-to-learning conversations. This is because the shifts from less open to more open-to-learning conversations are as much about changes in values and ways of thinking as they are about changes in communication skills. Hard and fast rules also do not work because good conversations are responsive to context and to the other person. Despite this, it is possible to identify some of the recurring components of open-to-learning conversations. Table 3 identifies some of these components and shows how a leader might use them in conversations about the quality of teaching.”….

Nevertheless, she lists 7 components (starting points?):

  1. Describe your concern as your point of view. I need to tell you about a possible concern I have about.. I think we may have different views… I realise this may not be how you see it….
  2. Describe what your concern is based on. The reason why I was concerned is..
  3. Invite the other’s point of view. Pause and look at the other person or say.. What do you think?
  4. Paraphrase their point of view and check. I got three important messages from that…Am I on the right track?
  5. Detect and check important assumptions… What leads you to believe that the children…
  6. Establish common ground. The common ground might be based…
  7. Make a plan to get what you both want. How would you like to learn more about….

There are several YouTube videos that provide examples.  For example:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pV5KmINdTWY

 

 

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A Literate Home

Here’s a link that I think you will find helpful.  I found it on NEA’s Parent School Partners Group site.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-tips/how-to-create-a-literate-home/

Dialogue: Natural and/or learned!

A Framework for “Dialogue and Learning”

There are hundreds of blog posts, articles, and books that address “dialogue.” They range across age groups (infancy to adulthood), contexts (home, school, business, medicine, politics, public media), content (stories with particular themes or topics, science, history, art, math) and purposes. Some of these sources are simply noting the content of the dialogue, some the type of dialogue, some are critiquing the lack of or tenor of the dialogue, and some address how to teach/develop/learn to engage in meaningful dialogue for the purposes of learning, expanding ideas, and solving problems.
On this blog many of the posts have been related to school success and reading success, particularly as children grow from infancy through elementary school. In an effort to find patterns relevant to school and literacy success the following format will be used for future posts: Reasons, Roles, Rules, Routines and Rewards.

Reasons: What is/are the purposes for focusing on dialogue?

Roles: Who are the participants in the dialogue and how, in the particular context, are they related to each/one another?

Rules: Is there a set of “rules” that participants follow. Are the rules implicit or explicit. If implicit, are all of the participants aware of the rules? Do they all agree to the rules?

Routines: Dialogue entails multiple “turns” among participants. What kinds of “turns” are there? How do participants determine whose “turn” it is and what kind of contribution is appropriate? Meaningful? Helpful? How are the routines influenced by Reasons, Rules and Roles?

Rewards: Can dialogue really achieve the desired/specified “reasons” for all of the participants? How do we know?

7 Questions about Learning to Read and Reading to Learn. Q. 1 Who are the stakeholders?

Blog  for Jan 9 2014

So, Some Initial Thoughts on the 7 Questions/Topics

Each of those 7 questions deserves an in depth response.  Over the next year, I hope to address those 7 questions in depth.  Over the next week, I plan to make a start by posting some initial thoughts introducing people, sites, and ideas that have influenced my thinking recently.

I’m going to start with the WHO question.

Earlier (October 8th) I posted a blog visualizing reading success and noted  “who” is engaged in  reading success for students—the student him or herself, of course; but students have many advocates—parents, teachers, specialists, the professional school community, teacher educators, researchers, the school board, and members of the wider school community.

Contributors.  I think you can learn a lot about someone’s thinking by noticing who they pay attention to.  So, here are some of the people who have most recently contributed to and influenced my thinking:

The kids in Mrs. D’s kindergarten class!

Sharon D, a great Kindergarten teacher who is committed to every child in her class becoming a successful reader.

Theresa, a mom who has made an enormous commitment to giving her child the extra support and services she needed to be a successful reader.

Kim, a school board member interested in resources volunteers can provide for helping kids to be successful.

Brittany, a mom of a child with dyslexia who started a Facebook web page advocating for children with dyslexia: https://www.facebook.com/DecodingDyslexiaALA/posts/593889313999874

Mark, a superintendent who opens doors for literacy volunteers.

Peter, a principal interested in the possibility of volunteers to address the needs of struggling readers.

Elfrieda H. Hiebert and Taffy E. Raphael, whose text, Early Literacy Instruction, is one of the best comprehensive texts on early literacy—even though published in 1998—that I have read so far.  It is thorough, thoughtful, and vignette rich.

Elfrieda H. Hiebert also has an impressive site on text: http://textproject.org/topics/text-complexity/  It is a treasure that will help us address the complex question of choosing appropriate text for kids.

Kristin M. Gehsmann, St. Michael’s College, Vermont

Becoming More Effective in the Age of Accountability:  A High-Poverty School Narrows the Literacy Achievement Gap.  Kristin did an in depth study of one school’s efforts to close the achievement gap and reported 4 complex factors that accounted for success:

Context of the Individual School (including demographics, culture, staff, resources and expectations)

Coaching (professional development to address beliefs and behaviors)

Coherence (Alignment among standards, assessment, teaching practices, materials and professional development)

Compassion (The human side of school improvement)

Richard Allington’s article on Reading Rockets about Reading Instruction

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/96/   Allington maintains that 6 factors impact successful reading instruction:  Time, Texts, Teach, Talk, Tasks, and Test.  I’ll come back to these in a later blog when I address the “How” of Successful Reading Instruction.

All of the contributors whose work I curate on my Pinterest http://www.pinterest.com/franvt/dyslexia-and-early-literacy-learning/

and Scoop.it sites

http://www.scoop.it/t/dyslexia-and-early-literacy

And so?   I’ll keep reading and learning….more to come later.  What could you do with these ideas?  Can you bring attention to the importance of learning to read and reading to learn to other stakeholders/advocates?

Blog Prep for Jan 9 2014

So, Some Initial Thoughts on the 7 Questions/Topics

Each of those 7 questions deserves an in depth response.  Over the next year, I hope to address those 7 questions in depth.  Over the next week, I plan to make a start by posting some initial thoughts introducing people, sites, and ideas that have influenced my thinking recently.

I’m going to start with the WHO question.

Earlier (October 8th) I posted a blog visualizing reading success and noted  “who” is engaged in  reading success for students—the student him or herself, of course; but students have many advocates—parents, teachers, specialists, the professional school community, teacher educators, researchers, the school board, and members of the wider school community.

Contributors.  I think you can learn a lot about someone’s thinking by noticing who they pay attention to.  So, here are some of the people who have most recently contributed to and influenced my thinking:

The kids in Mrs. D’s kindergarten class!

Sharon D, a great Kindergarten teacher who is committed to every child in her class becoming a successful reader.

Theresa, a mom who has made an enormous commitment to giving her child the extra support and services she needed to be a successful reader.

Kim, a school board member interested in resources volunteers can provide for helping kids to be successful.

Brittany, a mom of a child with dyslexia who started a Facebook web page advocating for children with dyslexia: https://www.facebook.com/DecodingDyslexiaALA/posts/593889313999874

Mark, a superintendent who opens doors for literacy volunteers.

Peter, a principal interested in the possibility of volunteers to address the needs of struggling readers.

Elfrieda H. Hiebert and Taffy E. Raphael, whose text, Early Literacy Instruction, is one of the best comprehensive texts on early literacy—even though published in 1998—that I have read so far.  It is thorough, thoughtful, and vignette rich.

Elfrieda H. Hiebert also has an impressive site on text: http://textproject.org/topics/text-complexity/  It is a treasure that will help us address the complex question of choosing appropriate text for kids.

Kristin M. Gehsmann, St. Michael’s College, Vermont

Becoming More Effective in the Age of Accountability:  A High-Poverty School Narrows the Literacy Achievement Gap.  Kristin did an in depth study of one school’s efforts to close the achievement gap and reported 4 complex factors that accounted for success:

Context of the Individual School (including demographics, culture, staff, resources and expectations)

Coaching (professional development to address beliefs and behaviors)

Coherence (Alignment among standards, assessment, teaching practices, materials and professional development)

Compassion (The human side of school improvement)

Richard Allington’s article on Reading Rockets about Reading Instruction

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/96/   Allington maintains that 6 factors impact successful reading instruction:  Time, Texts, Teach, Talk, Tasks, and Test.  I’ll come back to these in a later blog when I address the “How” of Successful Reading Instruction.

All of the contributors whose work I curate on my Pinterest http://www.pinterest.com/franvt/dyslexia-and-early-literacy-learning/

and Scoop.it sites

http://www.scoop.it/t/dyslexia-and-early-literacy

And so?   I’ll keep reading and learning….more to come later.  What could you do with these ideas?  Can you bring attention to the importance of learning to read and reading to learn to other stakeholders/advocates?

Blog Prep for Jan 9 2014

So, Some Initial Thoughts on the 7 Questions/Topics

Each of those 7 questions deserves an in depth response.  Over the next year, I hope to address those 7 questions in depth.  Over the next week, I plan to make a start by posting some initial thoughts introducing people, sites, and ideas that have influenced my thinking recently.

I’m going to start with the WHO question.

Earlier (October 8th) I posted a blog visualizing reading success and noted  “who” is engaged in  reading success for students—the student him or herself, of course; but students have many advocates—parents, teachers, specialists, the professional school community, teacher educators, researchers, the school board, and members of the wider school community.

Contributors.  I think you can learn a lot about someone’s thinking by noticing who they pay attention to.  So, here are some of the people who have most recently contributed to and influenced my thinking:

The kids in Mrs. D’s kindergarten class!

Sharon D, a great Kindergarten teacher who is committed to every child in her class becoming a successful reader.

Theresa, a mom who has made an enormous commitment to giving her child the extra support and services she needed to be a successful reader.

Kim, a school board member interested in resources volunteers can provide for helping kids to be successful.

Brittany, a mom of a child with dyslexia who started a Facebook web page advocating for children with dyslexia: https://www.facebook.com/DecodingDyslexiaALA/posts/593889313999874

Mark, a superintendent who opens doors for literacy volunteers.

Peter, a principal interested in the possibility of volunteers to address the needs of struggling readers.

Elfrieda H. Hiebert and Taffy E. Raphael, whose text, Early Literacy Instruction, is one of the best comprehensive texts on early literacy—even though published in 1998—that I have read so far.  It is thorough, thoughtful, and vignette rich.

Elfrieda H. Hiebert also has an impressive site on text: http://textproject.org/topics/text-complexity/  It is a treasure that will help us address the complex question of choosing appropriate text for kids.

Kristin M. Gehsmann, St. Michael’s College, Vermont

Becoming More Effective in the Age of Accountability:  A High-Poverty School Narrows the Literacy Achievement Gap.  Kristin did an in depth study of one school’s efforts to close the achievement gap and reported 4 complex factors that accounted for success:

Context of the Individual School (including demographics, culture, staff, resources and expectations)

Coaching (professional development to address beliefs and behaviors)

Coherence (Alignment among standards, assessment, teaching practices, materials and professional development)

Compassion (The human side of school improvement)

Richard Allington’s article on Reading Rockets about Reading Instruction

http://www.readingrockets.org/article/96/   Allington maintains that 6 factors impact successful reading instruction:  Time, Texts, Teach, Talk, Tasks, and Test.  I’ll come back to these in a later blog when I address the “How” of Successful Reading Instruction.

All of the contributors whose work I curate on my Pinterest http://www.pinterest.com/franvt/dyslexia-and-early-literacy-learning/

and Scoop.it sites

http://www.scoop.it/t/dyslexia-and-early-literacy

And so?   I’ll keep reading and learning….more to come later.  What could you do with these ideas?  Can you bring attention to the importance of learning to read and reading to learn to other stakeholders/advocates?