A New Series on Struggling Readers and Learning to Read

This series will be posted on my TALK blog (http://frantoomeytalk.blogspot.com/)where the emphasis is on early reading (K-3) and understanding why so many children have difficulty learning to read.  These are the kids trapped in the Achievement Gap and kids who are Dyslexic and not provided with early and effective interventions.

There will be a series of posts on who, why, and what can we do to make sure that all kids become successful readers.

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Reading Skills for Struggling Readers

Learning to read is a complex task and some children struggle to become successful readers.  The research and instructional literature has told us that Grade 3 is a critical benchmark for determining whether kids will become successful readers.  That literature has also told us that kids must master a range of skills: phonological awareness, phonics/decoding, spelling, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency.  On my T.A.L.K. blog ( http://frantoomeytalk.blogspot.com/ ) I have focused on age 3 to grade 3 language/literacy development, especially for kids who have learning challenges.

Over the next few months, I will focus here on the reading/literacy skills kids need and CAN develop in grades 4-8.  I will begin with comprehension, then address vocabulary, and then fluency.  In those blogs I will consider the role of oral language and writing/spelling as well as reading.

I am going to use an ABC’s format.

A for About.  Offering an  annotated bibliography of research and literature from expert researchers/practitioners, I’ll highlight those authors who have influenced my work and/or have widespread acknowledgement as experts.

B for Begin. Using those annotated sources, I’ll highlight ones that offer a place for teachers, special educators and parents to begin an instructional process.

C for Commitment.  Using A and B sources, I’ll map out a substantial teaching  sequence for some of those sources, with goals and objectives, instructional ideas and ….tools for progress monitoring.

 

Parent-Teacher Communication Challenges

A child’s teacher has a significant impact of that child’s life….at every grade.  It is so important for both teacher and parent to work at meaningful communication.  I believe that both teachers and parents have good intentions.  Here is an example of a conversation that we can learn from:

Parent-Teacher Communication from Understood

What Having the “Wrong” Teacher Taught Me About My Son With ADHD

My Parent Journey blog post by ToughTopics
Aug 11, 2016

“I also learned how important it was to communicate with the teacher early and often. I tried to arrange a meeting for the first week of school so I could explain my son’s challenges and strengths. Once, a teacher who didn’t seem like a good fit turned out to be great for my son once we really started talking…”

Get tips on how to improve your relationship with your child’s teacher. Use these sentence starters to help kick off the conversation. And read expert advice on changing teachers during the school year.

A Vocabulary Teaching Template

Here’s another resource from one of my favorite Literacy sites:

Adventures in Literacy Land

“want to share my favorite vocabulary activity with you!  One of the great things about this Vocabulary Graphic Organizer is that it can be used K-5 and across all subject areas.  There is a free copy of the organizer later in this post….”

There is also a google slides version.

http://www.adventuresinliteracyland.com/2016/11/a-quick-easy-way-to-teach-vocabulary.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AdventuresInLiteracyLand+%28Adventures+in+Literacy+Land%29

Too Important to Wait: Words and Complex Texts

I have been very busy with two projects (The Achievement Gap workshop for Early Educators) and Meeting the needs of students with Dyslexia) and have had to neglect this blog.  But, in the process of these two commitments, I have been collecting many new resources.  I couldn’t wait to share this one:


  • Text Complexity
    A short webinar on the relationship between a text’s word frequency number and the Lexile number.

Presentation Slides with Audio

8 minutes, 45 seconds

The same content is available in text format in a new Frankly Freddy blog post:
Teaching Complex Text: Why Look at Word Frequency?

Reading Comprehension and “Testing” Challenges

Excellent resources from the Reading Sage blogger about Evidence-Based Selected Response Test Qs.

http://reading-sage.blogspot.com/2016/07/ebsr-evidencebased-selected-response.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingSageReviews+%28Reading+Sage+Reviews%29

EBSR Evidence‐Based Selected Response (EBSR) Multi‐Select

Reading Comprehension Test Questions | Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR)

“Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) are two-part reading comprehension test items. Students read a paired text or a single passage and choose the best answer from the answer choices. The first part of the questions are usually a tier 3 literary concepts and a clarifying cognitive concept. Students will then be asked to support their answer or extended response with text evidence…..”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listening and Learning

Reading Sage on Think Alouds

From the blog of  The Dyslexic Reading Teacher Sean Taylor,  a teacher whose work I highly respect and value!

 http://reading-sage.blogspot.com/2016/07/effective-think-aloud-think-aloud.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingSageReviews+%28Reading+Sage+Reviews%29

 Rethinking Ability Groups and Differentiation!

   ” Teachers are trained to use reading assessment data to differentiate and ability group students based on reading comprehension scores, yet many teachers never ability group based on the students listening levels. Many teachers never test the students listening comprehension ability. Why? Basing reading instruction and lessons on grade level reading scores alone is a mistake, student’s grade level listening comprehension levels are a clue to your students’ potential ability….”

 My Experience with Low Reading Scores and High Listening Comprehension!

       “Special educations students like me, that could barely decode at a first grade level in 5th grade, yet I could have easily understood literary concepts many years higher than my grade level. I never had a chance to test my ability and tackle complex literary concepts because I was always in a special education ability grouped reading class (differentiated) my whole public school career!  My education choices were accommodated, modified and differentiated to the point of being mute….”

 

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