Reading Skills for Struggling Readers

Source: Reading Skills for Struggling Readers

Reading Skills for Struggling Readers

Learning to read is a complex task and some children struggle to become successful readers.  The research and instructional literature has told us that Grade 3 is a critical benchmark for determining whether kids will become successful readers.  That literature has also told us that kids must master a range of skills: phonological awareness, phonics/decoding, spelling, vocabulary, comprehension and fluency.  On my T.A.L.K. blog ( http://frantoomeytalk.blogspot.com/ ) I have focused on age 3 to grade 3 language/literacy development, especially for kids who have learning challenges.

Over the next few months, I will focus here on the reading/literacy skills kids need and CAN develop in grades 4-8.  I will begin with comprehension, then address vocabulary, and then fluency.  In those blogs I will consider the role of oral language and writing/spelling as well as reading.

I am going to use an ABC’s format.

A for About.  Offering an  annotated bibliography of research and literature from expert researchers/practitioners, I’ll highlight those authors who have influenced my work and/or have widespread acknowledgement as experts.

B for Begin. Using those annotated sources, I’ll highlight ones that offer a place for teachers, special educators and parents to begin an instructional process.

C for Commitment.  Using A and B sources, I’ll map out a substantial teaching  sequence for some of those sources, with goals and objectives, instructional ideas and ….tools for progress monitoring.

 

Student to Teacher Feedback

Source: Student to Teacher Feedback

Important Enough to Back Track: Adult Communication that Impacts Student Success in Schoo

Source: Important Enough to Back Track: Adult Communication that Impacts Student Success in Schoo

Feedback Through Teacher-Student Dialogue

Source: Feedback Through Teacher-Student Dialogue

Feedback Through Teacher-Student Dialogue

Growth Mindset that goes beyond “effort”: Minor Mirror, Model, Mentor

Four Teaching  (Feedback) Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers

By Katrina Schwartz APRIL 3, 2017Mind Shift

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2017/04/03/four-strategies-that-promote-a-growth-mindset-in-struggling-readers/

Some short excerpts:

“Most often teachers spend their time assigning what students should read and how they should show what they read, monitoring to make sure students have done what was asked, and making decisions about what students will do and how they will do it. Those roles make the teacher the main driver of the learning. In order to step back from those traditional roles, teachers have to replace them with new strategies.

“There’s a place for those three, but when that’s our main role there isn’t space for ownership and to develop that growth mindset,” Goldberg said. She coaches teachers to think of themselves in four very different roles, and to step back from constantly stepping in when students struggle. A big part of that is making it clear that struggle is part of reading, not a unique experience to students learning to read. It’s common to start a book and be confused, or to read a passage and miss something, but teachers don’t often make it clear how universal that experience is, no matter one’s reading level. Rather than being assignors, monitors and managers, Goldberg coaches teachers to see themselves as miners, mirrors, models and mentors”

I encourage you to watch the 7 minute video where Goldberg teaches us how to be miners, mirrors, models and mentors.  The article continues with a description of these 4M roles.

 

 

Recommending a Book About Feedback

I don’t usually recommend purchasing books, but I think this one is well worth the investment.  Here is a brief description and a link:

How to Give Effective Feedback to Your Students, 2nd Edition

by Susan M. Brookhart

Table of Contents
Select a link to read sample content.

 

Chapter 6. Feedback: The Long View—Does Feedback Improve Learning?

A Short Excerpt:

“Feedback can lead to learning only if the students have opportunities to use it. One of the best ways you can help students learn to use feedback is to make sure you build in opportunities for students to use it fairly soon after they receive it. The “long view” of feedback, using the metaphor of a telescope lens, helps us remember to focus on the consequences of feedback. Did the feedback improve student learning?”

 

  • Model giving and using feedback yourself.
  • Teach students where feedback comes from.
  • Teach students self-and peer-assessment skills
  • Increase students’ interest in feedback because they own

Previous Older Entries