Feedback Through Teacher-Student Dialogue

Growth Mindset that goes beyond “effort”: Minor Mirror, Model, Mentor

Four Teaching  (Feedback) Moves That Promote A Growth Mindset In All Readers

By Katrina Schwartz APRIL 3, 2017Mind Shift

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2017/04/03/four-strategies-that-promote-a-growth-mindset-in-struggling-readers/

Some short excerpts:

“Most often teachers spend their time assigning what students should read and how they should show what they read, monitoring to make sure students have done what was asked, and making decisions about what students will do and how they will do it. Those roles make the teacher the main driver of the learning. In order to step back from those traditional roles, teachers have to replace them with new strategies.

“There’s a place for those three, but when that’s our main role there isn’t space for ownership and to develop that growth mindset,” Goldberg said. She coaches teachers to think of themselves in four very different roles, and to step back from constantly stepping in when students struggle. A big part of that is making it clear that struggle is part of reading, not a unique experience to students learning to read. It’s common to start a book and be confused, or to read a passage and miss something, but teachers don’t often make it clear how universal that experience is, no matter one’s reading level. Rather than being assignors, monitors and managers, Goldberg coaches teachers to see themselves as miners, mirrors, models and mentors”

I encourage you to watch the 7 minute video where Goldberg teaches us how to be miners, mirrors, models and mentors.  The article continues with a description of these 4M roles.

 

 

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Parent-Teacher Communication Challenges

A child’s teacher has a significant impact of that child’s life….at every grade.  It is so important for both teacher and parent to work at meaningful communication.  I believe that both teachers and parents have good intentions.  Here is an example of a conversation that we can learn from:

Parent-Teacher Communication from Understood

What Having the “Wrong” Teacher Taught Me About My Son With ADHD

My Parent Journey blog post by ToughTopics
Aug 11, 2016

“I also learned how important it was to communicate with the teacher early and often. I tried to arrange a meeting for the first week of school so I could explain my son’s challenges and strengths. Once, a teacher who didn’t seem like a good fit turned out to be great for my son once we really started talking…”

Get tips on how to improve your relationship with your child’s teacher. Use these sentence starters to help kick off the conversation. And read expert advice on changing teachers during the school year.

Adult Communication that Impacts Student Success in School

Up to this time, this blog has focused on language development and use by children.  The idea was to focus on the ways in which children do and can develop the language skills that help them to be successful learners.  There is a wealth of information “out there” as well an on this blog about ways to do this.

It is time for a new focus: the communication of adults that impacts children’s success in school and beyond.  Teachers and parents talk about children and their success or lack of success in school, administrators and teachers talk about children, special educators and teachers talk about children.  Support staff members and “outside” experts “communicate” about children and their success or lack of success in school.  What do we know about how these “stakeholders” (is that the correct term?) talk to each/one another about children’s success in school?  How much of their conversations address the reasons for children’s success or lack of success and what each adult does/can do to ensure that success.

I am going to start with a very brief video (4+ minutes) featuring an expert on adult communication about children’s success in school.  I “found” this video when I googled the topic “open to learning.”  Here is my starting point: exploring what this well respected expert has to say.  More to follow.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_l5-HKIR1s

Here is a follow-up video with more detail about “Open to learning communication.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rB7wP8WJZeU

The Power of Words – Building Vocabulary Age 3 to Grade 3

Too Important to Wait: Words and Complex Texts

I have been very busy with two projects (The Achievement Gap workshop for Early Educators) and Meeting the needs of students with Dyslexia) and have had to neglect this blog.  But, in the process of these two commitments, I have been collecting many new resources.  I couldn’t wait to share this one:


  • Text Complexity
    A short webinar on the relationship between a text’s word frequency number and the Lexile number.

Presentation Slides with Audio

8 minutes, 45 seconds

The same content is available in text format in a new Frankly Freddy blog post:
Teaching Complex Text: Why Look at Word Frequency?

Learning to Read—Parents Can and Must Lead the Way—Starting Early!

Reading Rockets series on Empowering Parents (of children who struggle with learning to read): http://www.readingrockets.org/shows/launching/empowering Getting support for your struggling reader “If you have a child who is a struggling reader, your family is not alone. Learning to read is a challenge for almost 40 percent of kids, and an even bigger challenge for their parents. Empowering Parents, a PBS special hosted by Al Roker, visits schools in Huntingtown, Maryland, and Portland, Oregon, to see how families learn to identify early signs of reading problems and find ideas for getting their kids the help and support they need to succeed at reading.” This is a series of 2 to 8 minute videos on what parents can do to get their children the help they need in learning to read.

It highlights the success that happens when parents and teachers work together.

Dialogue Blog Themes

DIALOGUE

ORAL LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT

     EARLY LITERACY           ↔    SUCCESSFUL READERS

↑↓

ADVOCACY AND THE ACHIEVEMENT GAP

↓↑

CCSS-ELA STANDARDS

↓↑

ASSESSMENT & PROGRESS MONITORING

↓↑

CHOOSING TEXTS

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