Finding time for Vocabulary learning

More good ideas from Carla

http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=46d3f621bf29bd594d381352d&id=fb2fd69a46&e=9322d92f52

Vocabulary Resource from the Reading Sage

Note the number of “direction” words and “cognitive verbs”!

http://reading-sage.blogspot.com/2016/12/tier-2-academic-vocabulary-test.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingSageReviews+%28Reading+Sage+Reviews%29

Tier 2 Academic Vocabulary Test Vocabulary

“Tier 2 Academic “Question” Vocabulary and Phrases Test Analysis for Grade 4 and 5

Students will fail all or most TerraNova, STAAR, SAT, FCAT, PARCC, SBAC Smarter Balance, and Common Core reading assessment if they do not understand the tier 2 academic vocabulary and phrasing used on reading comprehension test questions!

This is a quick look at the tier 2 vocabulary found in grade 4 and 5 reading assessment. ….”

List follows on his post!

 

 

Dialogue is important, process is important, and so is content!

From Knowledge Matters, a short except

http://tntp.org/room-to-run/knowledge-matters

“In Chris Hayes’ second-grade classroom at Westergard Elementary School in Reno, Nevada, this is how her students will finish off their unit on the Civil War—synthesizing their knowledge, forming opinions based on evidence, and writing and talking about it.”

“Here’s the assignment this group of second graders will tackle: “A hero is a person who is admired for courage and achievements that help others. Using evidence found in the following documents, your knowledge of our readings, and at least four of the vocabulary words above, rank all of these people in order from least heroic to most heroic. Then, write about your top three most heroic choices. Make sure to use details to support your reasoning for why these people are heroic.”

……..

“We hear kids this age having complex conversations with each other, and our reaction is that it’s cute. But it isn’t cute. It’s what we should expect them to do,” Mrs. Hayes says. “The kids are engaged. They think learning is fun. But I don’t teach this way because it’s fun. That makes it too simple. What we’re doing for them is very important.”

“It’s important not just because these second graders are building critical content knowledge that helps them become stronger readers, writers, listeners, and speakers (and that will be built upon in higher grades). It’s also important because in asking her students to do so much active thinking and engaging on these topics, Chris Hayes is laying the foundation for her students to persevere through more challenging work in the years to come. She is building students who own their learning.”

 

Listening and Learning

Reading Sage on Think Alouds

From the blog of  The Dyslexic Reading Teacher Sean Taylor,  a teacher whose work I highly respect and value!

 http://reading-sage.blogspot.com/2016/07/effective-think-aloud-think-aloud.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingSageReviews+%28Reading+Sage+Reviews%29

 Rethinking Ability Groups and Differentiation!

   ” Teachers are trained to use reading assessment data to differentiate and ability group students based on reading comprehension scores, yet many teachers never ability group based on the students listening levels. Many teachers never test the students listening comprehension ability. Why? Basing reading instruction and lessons on grade level reading scores alone is a mistake, student’s grade level listening comprehension levels are a clue to your students’ potential ability….”

 My Experience with Low Reading Scores and High Listening Comprehension!

       “Special educations students like me, that could barely decode at a first grade level in 5th grade, yet I could have easily understood literary concepts many years higher than my grade level. I never had a chance to test my ability and tackle complex literary concepts because I was always in a special education ability grouped reading class (differentiated) my whole public school career!  My education choices were accommodated, modified and differentiated to the point of being mute….”

 

What Do We Know About Teaching Reading Comprehension Skills?

Maybe we don’t understand what readers really do – and why it matters

Here is an excerpt from Wiggins detailed posting.

By grantwiggins  posted Wed Feb 11 2015

“How well are we doing in comprehension of text as a nation? You know the answer. We are doing poorly when it comes to genuine comprehension:

What should we infer from the data?

Numerous causes and their implied solutions, as readers know, have been proposed for flat reading scores: poverty, low expectations, inadequate background knowledge, an anti-boy bias in schools (especially in terms of book selection), IQ links to reading ability, computer games, TV, etc. etc.

The utterly flat national trend line, over decades, says to me that none of these theories holds up well, no matter how plausible each may seem to its proponents. Perhaps it’s time to explore a more radical but common sense notion: maybe we don’t yet understand reading comprehension and how it develops over time.

Maybe we have jumped to solutions before understanding the problems of naïve and superficial comprehension. Maybe we still haven’t specified, in diagnostic detail, what real readers do when they supposedly read books and articles and try to comprehend – regardless of what “good readers” supposedly do.

At the very least: it is a good time to question the premise that we understand the problem…”

https://grantwiggins.wordpress.com/2015/02/11/maybe-we-dont-understand-what-readers-really-do-and-why-it-matters/

Several years ago, along with two of my colleagues, we developed a strategy-based reading comprehension program for middle school students. Although it hasn’t been updated recently, I am posting the link:

http://explorience.pbworks.com/w/page/19411524/FrontPage

Wiggins’s posting will give me a lot to think about.