Oral Language AND Literacy: Not either/or

Oral Language AND Literacy: Not either/or

A short excerpt from an article published in Reading Rockets

http://www.readingrockets.org/blogs/shanahan-literacy/role-early-oral-language-reading-comprehension?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingRockets_StrugglingReaders+%28Reading+Rockets%3A+Struggling+Reader+Resources%29 ….

“Recently, Chris Lonigan and I (Timothy Shanahan) wrote a short article for Language Magazine. It’s focus is on “The Role of Early Oral Language in Literacy Development.” I think both Chris and I have bona fides in the “phonics/decoding/foundational skills” community and have the scars to show it. But we are both also advocates of the so-called “simple view” of reading — students need to know how to decode from print to language and they need to know how to understand language. This is a both, not an either/or.

Here is a link to the article. Hope you enjoy it.”

And here is a short excerpt from that article:

“Response to intervention in preschool holds promise for successful early language development but several key issues must be considered. For one, preschools often serve disproportionate numbers of children who need Tier 2 or Tier 3 services, which causes staffing concerns. Also, more research is needed on the effect of interventions for children from low-income families, children with disabilities, English language learners, and children from underrepresented ethnic groups.
The NELP report, along with other studies of children’s early language development, suggests that early oral language has a growing contribution to later reading comprehension — a contribution that is separate from the important role played by the alphabetic code. As such, improving young children’s oral language development should be a central goal during the preschool and kindergarten years.”

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Expanding Learning Through Conversation: Three Big Ideas from Sharon

https://kindergartenlife.wordpress.com/2015/10/25/creating-relationships-38-days-vermontkkids123/  A few short excerpts:

Conversation and Reflecting on Learning

“I have shared before young children are naturally curious so why not find ways for them to have conversations and reflect on what they are learning and curious about with others and experience “how to” have a conversation and reflect alongside others….”

Inviting Parents on the Learning Journey

“Our class blog provides snapshots of the big ideas we are exploring.  Through our class blog parents have an opportunity to engage in face to face conversations with their child about what they are exploring.  This is important because I want parents to be a part of our learning journey….”

Learning is for Everyone

“Learning is for everyone.  The magic and heart of my work as a teacher is to offer hope and to develop relationships that will support my efforts to learn alongside my students, their families and others globally. I believe that being transparent and having an open mind when approaching learning explorations gives me opportunities to model the value and importance of perspective and how it is important when collaborating and learning…”

The Power of Picture Books

Picture Books: Poetry in Motion

Here’s a brief excerpt from Reading Rockets:

July 6, 2015

“I’ve been thinking a lot about picture books and why some work and are memorable while others just land with a thud when read. I continue to ask myself what is it about those picture books that resonate with readers and particularly those that can be shared many times between adults and children, delighting both….”

http://www.readingrockets.org/blog/picture-books-poetry-motion?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingRockets_StrugglingRea ders+%28Reading+Rockets%3A+Struggling+Reader+Resources%29

A Literate Home

Here’s a link that I think you will find helpful.  I found it on NEA’s Parent School Partners Group site.

http://www.pbs.org/parents/education/reading-language/reading-tips/how-to-create-a-literate-home/

New Read Aloud Approaches in Kindergarten. What do you think?

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/05/13/new-read-aloud-st rategies-transform-story-time.html

Video

More Than a Gap in Words

Published in Print: April 22, 2015, as Research on Quality of Conversation Holds Deeper Clues Into Word Gap

Key to Vocabulary Gap Is Quality of Conversation, Not Dearth of Words

By Sarah D. Sparks

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/04/22/key-to-vocabulary-gap-is-quality-of.html?cmp=ENL-EU-NEWS1

…….

“The “30 million-word” gap is arguably the most famous but least significant part of a landmark study, Meaningful Differences in the Everyday Experiences of Young Children, by the late University of Kansas child psychologists Betty Hart and Todd R. Risley. As the work turns 20 this year, new research and more advanced measuring techniques have cast new light on long-overshadowed, and more nuanced, findings about exactly how adult interactions with infants and young children shape their early language development.”

….

Parent-Child Conversations

“This is the challenge of translating science to policy, and when one study captures the imagination of the public, and policy is made based on one study,” Mr. Barnett said. A study “has to be viewed in the context of the much larger body of knowledge about language and family and experience.”

…….

“Conversational turns are vastly more important than the number of words a child is exposed to,” Ms. Gilkerson said.

 

 

 

 

Update on the Achievement Gap

William Teale (University of Illinois at Chicago, Education) just uploaded a paper on Academia.edu:

Early Childhood Literacy: Policy for the Coming Decade

by William Teale et. al.

https://www.academia.edu/11407858/Early_Childhood_Literacy_Policy_for_the_Coming_Decade

Gaps in 3 important areas:

Standards and curriculum

Capacity of educational leaders and teachers

Family involvement

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