A Vocabulary Teaching Template

Here’s another resource from one of my favorite Literacy sites:

Adventures in Literacy Land

“want to share my favorite vocabulary activity with you!  One of the great things about this Vocabulary Graphic Organizer is that it can be used K-5 and across all subject areas.  There is a free copy of the organizer later in this post….”

There is also a google slides version.

http://www.adventuresinliteracyland.com/2016/11/a-quick-easy-way-to-teach-vocabulary.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+AdventuresInLiteracyLand+%28Adventures+in+Literacy+Land%29

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A Middle School Vocabulary Challenge and Blog

 

A 90 Minute Vocabulary Challenge from Carla’s blog:

This month the following blog will be posted

on key national educational blog sites…including ILA’s 
(International Literacy Association – formerly IRA)
because they think it’s important! 
(which it is…)

http://us5.campaign-archive1.com/?u=46d3f621bf29bd594d381352d&id=3ed3b846f0&e=9322d92f52

 

 

The Power of Words – Building Vocabulary Age 3 to Grade 3

Too Important to Wait: Words and Complex Texts

I have been very busy with two projects (The Achievement Gap workshop for Early Educators) and Meeting the needs of students with Dyslexia) and have had to neglect this blog.  But, in the process of these two commitments, I have been collecting many new resources.  I couldn’t wait to share this one:


  • Text Complexity
    A short webinar on the relationship between a text’s word frequency number and the Lexile number.

Presentation Slides with Audio

8 minutes, 45 seconds

The same content is available in text format in a new Frankly Freddy blog post:
Teaching Complex Text: Why Look at Word Frequency?

Reading Comprehension and “Testing” Challenges

Excellent resources from the Reading Sage blogger about Evidence-Based Selected Response Test Qs.

http://reading-sage.blogspot.com/2016/07/ebsr-evidencebased-selected-response.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingSageReviews+%28Reading+Sage+Reviews%29

EBSR Evidence‐Based Selected Response (EBSR) Multi‐Select

Reading Comprehension Test Questions | Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR)

“Evidence-Based Selected Response (EBSR) are two-part reading comprehension test items. Students read a paired text or a single passage and choose the best answer from the answer choices. The first part of the questions are usually a tier 3 literary concepts and a clarifying cognitive concept. Students will then be asked to support their answer or extended response with text evidence…..”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Listening and Learning

Reading Sage on Think Alouds

From the blog of  The Dyslexic Reading Teacher Sean Taylor,  a teacher whose work I highly respect and value!

 http://reading-sage.blogspot.com/2016/07/effective-think-aloud-think-aloud.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+ReadingSageReviews+%28Reading+Sage+Reviews%29

 Rethinking Ability Groups and Differentiation!

   ” Teachers are trained to use reading assessment data to differentiate and ability group students based on reading comprehension scores, yet many teachers never ability group based on the students listening levels. Many teachers never test the students listening comprehension ability. Why? Basing reading instruction and lessons on grade level reading scores alone is a mistake, student’s grade level listening comprehension levels are a clue to your students’ potential ability….”

 My Experience with Low Reading Scores and High Listening Comprehension!

       “Special educations students like me, that could barely decode at a first grade level in 5th grade, yet I could have easily understood literary concepts many years higher than my grade level. I never had a chance to test my ability and tackle complex literary concepts because I was always in a special education ability grouped reading class (differentiated) my whole public school career!  My education choices were accommodated, modified and differentiated to the point of being mute….”

 

Learning to Read—Parents Can and Must Lead the Way—Starting Early!

Reading Rockets series on Empowering Parents (of children who struggle with learning to read): http://www.readingrockets.org/shows/launching/empowering Getting support for your struggling reader “If you have a child who is a struggling reader, your family is not alone. Learning to read is a challenge for almost 40 percent of kids, and an even bigger challenge for their parents. Empowering Parents, a PBS special hosted by Al Roker, visits schools in Huntingtown, Maryland, and Portland, Oregon, to see how families learn to identify early signs of reading problems and find ideas for getting their kids the help and support they need to succeed at reading.” This is a series of 2 to 8 minute videos on what parents can do to get their children the help they need in learning to read.

It highlights the success that happens when parents and teachers work together.

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