Collecting Examples, Models, and Ideas

I started curating “Dialogue and Learning” sites on Scoopit* last September and have posted 152 links that seem to range all over the place.  Add to those the sources I have collected over the last 25 years to use in my “Language and Learning” graduate course for educators and I have a lot of good things to share.  The question I’m working on right now, is how to organize this mass of information.  My first attempt at organizing sources from the web resulted in the following chart.  Over the next month, I’m going to annotate these and offer at least one  blog entry for each category.

*http://www.scoop.it/t/dialogue-and-learning

Frameworks for Dialogue Blog

 

Web Based Topics/Categories for “Dialogue”

Topics/by Category Points/Issues/Models Date/Ref
Literacy

Reading

Writing

Speaking/Listening

   
Classroom Discourse

Dialogue

Discussion

Participation

Collaboration

Conversation

Talk in Class

Interaction

Grand Conversations

Active Language Leaning

   
Context

Online

Culture

Home/School/Social Class

   
Cognitive Purposes

Argument/Raising Issues

Thinking

Deep Learning

   
Genre Pedagogy

 Talking (writing, speaking..

like a….historian, scientist, ….

   
Learning

Feedback

Explanation

Questions/Questioning

   
Profession Dialogue

Professional Development

Business/Economics

Doctors/Patients

Politics/Civil Discourse

   
Age Groups/Development

Babies/Preschoolers

Elementary School

Teens

College

Adult Education

   

A New Start

I’ve been trying to get started again on my Dialogue-Thinking-Learning Blog, and I’ve found two great sources to restart.

The first source in The Learning Spy (A Language Based Pedagogy)

http://learningspy.co.uk/2013/03/29/language-and-pedagogy/comment-page-1/#comment-1589

And the Learning Spy led me to the second   (What’s Language Doing  Here):

http://whatslanguagedoinghere.wordpress.com/2013/03/24/blog-4-genre-pedagogy/

Both of these sources do a great job of explaining and creating excitement about the role of oral language (dialogue/discourse) in learning across the content areas.  Basing their work on Halliday, they demonstrate how central yet neglected the use of  oral language pedagogy is.

 

Well worth reading.